ATMEL ARM Linux

After looking into some articles about embedded linux, I came across a blog by Henrik Forsten, which I found really interesting and I thought it would be a good way to get into building, assembling and one day, designing some boards by myself.

I grabbed the design files from Henrick’s github, uploaded them to OSH Park, and ordered a set of 3. I also ordered a solder paste stencil from OSH stencils for the top layer (as I thought it would have been pretty tricky to apply paste via a stencil after the top layer had been populated.)

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Setting up the stencil, by taping it to the desk

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Line up the stencil, tape only one side, and add some paste

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Spread the paste into the holes. Be careful not to lift up the stencil while spreading, otherwise the paste can spread over too much.

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Carefully remove the stencil, and place the components with tweezers

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Place the board into the re-flow oven. I taped down a thermal couple onto another PCB I used to prop up the board I want to re-flow

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Try to get the board as level as you can, so the components stay in the middle when the solder re-flows.

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I used Henrik’s re-flow board, running a python script to handle the PID control loop. A AU$30 oven from Kmart works pretty well.

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The top layer, with all the SMD components in place. I decided to do the USB-A connector later by hand, to make adding the components to the bottom layer easier.

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Applying the paste to the bottom layer by hand.

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ATMEL ARM Linux